Three Engaging Games for Indoor Recess

By Mark Kretzmann

Photo by DC_Colombia/iStock / Getty Images

At many elementary schools indoor recess is common.  The weather, the location, and other factors may lead to recess being held inside the school building. Indoor recess is challenging but it is also an opportunity to help children practice unique social skills.  Here are three fun, engaging, commercially available indoor games that children generally like to play together.  These games are affordable, easy to learn, accommodate more than two players and are popular across multiple settings which allows children to generalize their skills to the home or community.  These games can still be used if they are missing a part or slightly damaged and no batteries are required.  remakingrecess.org does not sell or profit from these games.  We only recommend them.  Of course, there are many other fun, cost-effective options to support peer engagement.

Twister:  Twister is a classic game played on a plastic mat showing colored circles in a grid.  A spinner tells the players where to put their hands and feet.  Twister has simple rules allowing children to practice body control in close proximity to peers without a lot of instruction.  A good way to introduce a beginner to the game is to allow them to spin the spinner and observe the gameplay.  Twister is affordable retailing for under $20, and durable.  The plastic mat can easily be cleaned and the game can be played without the spinner if necessary.  Twister is produced by Hasbro.

Jenga:  Jenga is a block stacking/removing game.  Players take turns removing blocks from a block tower and placing them on the top.  Play continues until a player topples the tower.  Jenga allows many players and it holds  their attention because they don't want to miss the moment when the tower falls.  Jenga is available for about $15.  The blocks are simple and durable and the game can still be played if a few blocks are missing.  Multiple sets of Jenga can be combined.  Jenga is produced by Hasbro.

Uno:  Uno is a popular card game where players start with seven cards and take turns discarding cards based on the color or number of the card topping the discard pile.  There are wild cards and a few other fun specialty cards incorporated into the otherwise simple, colorful deck of cards.  Uno is easy to play and fast moving.  An Uno deck can be used even if it is missing cards.  Retailing for around $8 it's a great buy for indoor recess.  Uno is produced by Mattel.

Understanding Classroom Social Networks

By Jill Locke

Do you know who your child's friends are in his or her classroom?

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By asking children to privately write down who likes to hang out together we can reveal a social network of their classroom’s peer groupings that indicates: 1) who's connected to whom, and 2) the strength of that relationship. Four different classifications are possible that will help you understand a child’s social salience in the classroom. Children can be considered “isolates”, which means they do not belong to any peer group in the classroom or peripheral, which means they are in the bottom 30% of their classroom’s social structure. Children also can be secondary, which means they are very well connected in their classroom (the middle 40%) or nuclear, which means they are highly salient and within the top 30% of their classroom’s social structure. It is important for all children to be connected to at least one other child in their classroom to promote healthy social development.

Pictured above is a map of a real classroom's social network. All of the names have been changed. Each line represents a connection between children. The number in parentheses represents the number of times that child was nominated to any peer group, or his/her individual salience. The number among the lines is the child’s group salience, which determines how well connected the peer group is overall. Joe is a student with autism. Both he and Bailey are considered isolates. Felipe and Brian are considered peripheral as they were infrequently nominated (1) time each and have a group salience of (1) as well. Valery and Zara are considered secondary, whereas Jessica and Lily are considered nuclear given their high individual salience (10) and (12), respectively, and high group salience (11). Understanding social networks and the power dynamics within a classroom is an important way to learn more about your child’s social development. And remember, there are ways to improve social network inclusion – is your child, isolated, peripheral, secondary, or nuclear?

Counting "Everyone" in the Everyone Category

An 11-year-old student named Harriet wrote an insightful essay with the above title on her observations about an apparently neurodiverse classmate, Eleanor, at her new school. She powerfully describes that Eleanor’s exclusion from activities and the unfair treatment toward her means “Eleanor isn’t even counted enough as a person/student in my class to be included in the ‘everyone’ category.” Furthermore, Harriet brightly suggests practices, such as in use of paraprofessionals, generally aligned with Remaking Recess: “If there has to be an aide to help a student, he wouldn’t be there for any one person; the aide would help everyone. If any kid was having a hard time, the aide would check-in.” Indeed, she helped to inspire the “Flying Solo, or Birds of a Feather Stick Together” post on this blog through this pearl of wisdom: “Wherever you are in the world, everyone should feel comfort and belonging knowing that you always have people to hold on to you as you fly your way and they fly theirs. Eleanor isn’t given the opportunity to know that she belongs and to feel the freedom to fly.”

Not only as we enter this season of giving, but generally, we have a role to play in helping more students and other people support the need for inclusion. As Harriet’s mother Susan on October 15 explained in reply to comments, Harriet conceived the story and insights, but key adults in her life have helped shape her values: “All parents and teachers offer children a lens through which to make meaning of the world. Children take it and go. Where they go is how the world changes. Thank goodness.”

Read Harriet’s post here.